Dr. Mohammad Shamim Ahasan

Dr. Mohammad Shamim Ahasan

Department of Infectious Diseases & Immunology

Dr. Ahasan is currently working as a postdoctoral associate in the Department of Infectious Diseases and Immunology of the University of Florida, Gainesville. His research focuses on quantifying the genetic variability among reoviruses negatively impacting Florida deer as the first step in developing an efficacious vaccine against these significant viral pathogens. Dr. Ahasan is also involved with research to identify various aquatic pathogens in fish, reptiles, and aquatic mammals using next generation sequencing technology. Before joining in UF in 2017, he completed his PhD at James Cook University in Townsville, Australia where he studied the green sea turtle gut microbiome. He is a faculty at the Hajee Mohammad Danesh Science and Technology University, Bangladesh where he serves as a molecular epidemiologist with expertise in emerging veterinary pathogens including zoonoses, host associated microbiota, and microbial ecology.

Photo: Identifying emerging pathogens using culture dependent and independent techniques.

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Dr. Yogesh K. Ahlawat

Dr. Yogesh K. Ahlawat

Institute for Food and Agricultural SciencesHorticultural Sciences

Dr. Ahlawat works on plant cell wall modification for biofuel production. He genetically manipulates cell wall specific enzymes like laccase and peroxidase using a tissue specific promoter to alter the lignin production for increasing saccharification. He has worked with DowDupont as an intern on maize cells for developing a rapid testing system for trait development. Dr. Ahlawat is currently a Biological Scientist in Horticulture/IFAS at UF. He earned his Ph.D. in Biological Sciences at Michigan Technological University. His doctoral work was sponsored through Indian governmentalfunding. 


 

Dr. Harneet Arora

Dr. Harneet Arora

Department of Physical Therapy

Dr. Arora is investigating the natural history of disease progression in both upper and lower extremities using functional tests and magnetic resonance imaging in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients. While DMD is an incurable disease, Dr. Arora's reserach will make it possible to identify appropriate age groups to evaluate the efficacy of therapeutic drugs in onging clinical trials. Dr. Arora is involved in developing a protocol for an exercise study in mice using phosphorous magnetic resonance spectroscopy, where she is measuring the energetics in healthy controls with the long term goal of moving the protocol to DMD patients. This would help in early detection of the disease in DMD patients. Dr. Arora earned her PhD in Rehabilitation Science from the University of Florida. She has been recognized for her exceptional science communication skills, including "Best Poster Award in Research Section" at the American Physical Therapy Association–Combined Sections Meeting, Anaheim, CA. 


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Dr. Ana C. Bohórquez

Dr. Ana C. Bohórquez

UF Herbert Wertheim College of Engineering

Dr. Bohórquez's research has been focused on the intersection between biophysics and nanomaterials, particularly in the engineering and testing of nanomaterials for biomedical and consumer product applications.  Currently, Dr. Bohórquez works in the Herbert Wertheim College of Engineering Research Service Centers (RSC) at the University of Florida under the supervision of Dr. Luisa Amelia Dempere. She is using her training and expertise as a chemical and biomedical engineer to develop solutions to research problems faced by a wide variety of RSC users.Dr. Bohórquez has made significant contributions to the assessment of «stability» and «mobility» of nanoparticles in biological environments in-situ through magnetic measurements, and in the development of magnetic nanoparticles that are colloidally stable in biological environments suitable for magnetic fluid hyperthermia (figure below). She serves as a volunteer reviewer for the International Journal of Nanomedicine. Dr. Bohórquez obtained her undergraduate degree in Chemical Engineering from the Universidad Central de Venezuela in 2009. Later, she attended the University of Puerto Rico - Mayagüez where she completed an MS in Chemical Engineering (2012). Dr. Bohórquez earned her Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering from the University of Florida in 2016. Dr. Bohórquez was invited to present her research at P&G’s Focusing on Industrial Recruitment of Scientific Talent (FIRST) 2017 Conference.

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Dr. Jamie Bojko

Dr. Jamie Bojko

Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences 

School of Forest Resources and Conservation

Emerging Pathogens Institute

The Behringer Laboratory

Dr. Bojko's research involves screening for and systematically identifying the symbionts of invertebrate and vertebrate hosts, primarily focusing on Crustacea. The diseases Dr. Bojko works with include microparasites (Microsporidia, bacteria and viruses) and macroparasites (Acanthocephala, Isopoda, Trematoda). He uses and develops histological, TEM, molecular diagnostic and metagenomic methods to better understand parasite diversity and taxonomy. One arm of Dr. Bojko's research involves understanding the role of the microbiome in biological invasions. A second includes understanding the effects of native diseases in local ecology. Dr. Bojko earned his Ph.D. in the Faculty of Biology Sciences, at the Universiyt of Leeds. Photo below: Blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) ecology project involving native range sampling and single-leg diagnostic methods to identify a virus, 'Callinectes sapidus Reovirus 1' (CsRV1).

Dr. Fabio Prior Caltabellotta

Dr. Fabio Prior Caltabellotta

Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, School of Forest Resources & Conservation, IFAS

Dr. Caltabellotta is currently a Postdoctoral Associate at the Program of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences working on developing a management strategy evaluation (MSE) framework and a user-friendly tool "Shiny App" that allows angler groups to explore and evaluate the relative effect of proposed management strategies (e.g., lower and upper size limits, bag limits, timing of openings, and degree of barotrauma reduction) to ensure a healthy fish stock while allowing reasonable access to this resource. He has experience as a Professor at the Centro Universitário Monte Serrat (Unimonte) from 2013 - 2016, teaching a total of 6 courses (Fishery Biology, Fisheries Management, Aquaculture, Fishery Technology, Ichthyology, and Nekton), where he served as a mentor for undergraduate student committees.

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Dr. Pablo Emiliano Canton

Dr. Pablo Emiliano Canton

Department of Entomology and Nematology

Dr. Canton is researching the gut physiology of the agricultural pest Nezara viridula, the southern green stink bug, in order to gain insights that will help develop new and better strategies for its control in crop fields. He earned his PhD in Biochemistry from the National Autonomous University of Mexico. Dr. Canton has developed a strong research career in insect control with multiple publications, as well as being co-founder and member of a science communication and outreach NGO. This combination is critical in bridging the gap between academia and those who would benefit from scientific applications. Right Photo: N. viridula, the southern green stink bug.

 

Dr. Antonio Castellano-Hinojosa

Dr. Antonio Castellano-Hinojosa

IFAS Department of Soil and Water SciencesSouthwest Florida Research and Education Center

Dr. Castellano-Hinojosa is currently working as a postdoctoral associate of Soil Microbiology in the Department of Soil and Water Sciences of the University of Florida/IFAS Southwest Florida Research and Education Center (SWFREC). His research focuses on evaluating the impact of cover crops on the soil microbiome, tree health, and citrus production working with Dr. Sarah Strauss. Before joining UF in July 2019, he completed his PhD at University of Granada (Granada, Spain) where he studied the effect of nitrogen fertilization on the emission of greenhouse gasses and microbial biodiversity in agricultural soils. View Dr. Castellano-Hinojosa's publications

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DR. EDWIN ALEXANDER CERQUERA-SOACHA

DR. EDWIN ALEXANDER CERQUERA-SOACHA

Department of Neurology

Dr. Cerquera is currently a postdoctoral associate in the Brain Dynamics Program of the Wilder Center for Epilepsy Research under the Department of Neurology, College of Medicine. Prior to joining the Brain Dynamics Program, Dr. Cerquera was a postdoctoral fellow in the Brain Mapping Lab in UF’s Department of Biomedical Engineering. Dr. Cerquera was instrumental in evaluating the utility of nonlinear-connectivity metrics for characterization of signals recorded with deep brain stimulation (DBS) devices and analysis of cognitive-motor tasks in electrocorticography (ECoG) signals, respectively, within the Brain Mapping Lab research group. 

Dr Cerquera’s research interests include digital processing of neural and brain signals, linear and nonlinear time series analysis, data analysis and visualization. His primary focus is on programming softwares such as Matlab. He has published his work in peer-reviewed journals primarily in the fields of electroencephalography and polysomnography signal processing for characterization of biomarkers in neurophysiological disorders and sleep apnea, respectively. Currently, his research is focused on the characterization of ECoG signals for analysis of motor coordination.

Dr Cerquera earned his Bachelor degree in Biomedical Engineering from the Universidad Antonio Nariño (UAN) in Bogota, Colombia. Subsequently, he completed his master’s studies in industrial automatization at the Universidad Nacional de Colombia – Manizales, and his doctoral thesis in the Ph.D. program “Neurosensory sciences and systems” at the Carl von Ossietzky Universitaet Oldenburg, Germany, under the supervision of Dr Jan Alfred Freund. Prior to joining the University of Florida in June 2017, he was a faculty member at the School of Electronic and Biomedical Engineering of the Universidad Antonio Nariño. Dr. Cerquera is fluent in English, German and Spanish, the latter as his native language. 

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Dr. Duane B. Corbett

Dr. Duane B. Corbett

Department of Aging and Geriatric Research

Dr. Corbett is currently a postdoctoral associate in the Department of Aging and Geriatric Research, College of Medicine. After completing his PhD in Exercise Physiology at Kent State University, he accepted a postdoctoral appointment at UF to study aging and mobility under the mentorship of Dr. Todd Manini. In 2016, he was awarded a fellowship to study pain and aging through the Integrative and Multidisciplinary Pain and Aging Research Training (IMPART) program (T32-AG049673, Fillingim PI) in partnership between the UF Pain Research Intervention Center of Excellence (PRICE) and UF Institute on Aging (IOA) under the mentorship of Drs. Roger Fillingim, Todd Manini, Joseph Riley, and Kimberly Sibille. As per the focus of his fellowship, Dr. Corbett’s current research interests are focused on the paradox of how movement can reduce, yet also induce pain, for the purpose of improving adherence to exercise prescription among older adults with chronic pain and reducing the risk of mobility disability. Dr. Corbett’s work has been presented at national and international science meetings.

Role of Movement-Evoked Pain in the Relationship between Chronic Pain and Age-Related Disability

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Dr. Caleb Cornaby

Dr. Caleb Cornaby

Department of Pathology, Immunology, and Laboratory Medicine

Dr. Cornaby has experience in the higher education research industry investigating risk allele phenotypes in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, Epstein-Barr virus, and psychosocial disorders that are the result of disease progression in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus. While there is currently no regimen of therapy that can reverse the autoimmune nature of Lupus, improvement in the treatment of Lupus patients is the priority of Dr. Cornaby’s current studies. Currently he is involved in preclinical trials investigating the efficacy of metabolism inhibitors in treating Lupus and risk allele phenotypes on T cell regulation of the immune system. Both the directly translational and basic immunology research that Dr. Cornaby is involved in has the potential to improve treatment for Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and our understanding of immune cell regulation. These and past projects have given Dr. Cornaby extensive experience with small animal models, conducting and managing pre-clinical trials, molecular and cell biology techniques, bio statistical data analysis, multi-color flow cytometry, and cell sorting. These skills have allowed him to continue contributing to his field as a clinical research scientist.

Dr. Cornaby earned his Ph.D. in Microbiology and Molecular Biology at Brigham Young University. He is the recipient of the prestigious Sterling Scholar of Science Presidential Scholar BYU Graduate Studies Grant (2015 - 2017) and is currently a UF College of Medicine Experimental Pathology Fellow

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Dr. Cara Louise Croft

Dr. Cara Louise Croft

Department of Neuroscience

Dr. Crofts research is focused on understanding how intracellular inclusions that build up in the brain in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease can cause whole brain organ failure. Dr. Croft has developed novel methods that use organotypic brain slice cultures and recombinant adeno-associated viruses to model these diseases in a dish. By using these unique methods, Dr. Croft can examine at a molecular and cellular level how these intracellular inclusions can drive neurodegeneration and cellular dysfunction and how we can most appropriately therapeutically target them. Dr. Croft earned her PhD in Neuroscience from King's College London, United Kingdom, where she was selected as a finalist to present her research to politicians and policy makers in the UK advocating for increased research funding for dementia. Dr. Croft has recently been awarded a 2 year post-doctoral fellowship from the Brightfocus Foundation to begin her path to academic independence.

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Dr. Ivone de Bem Oliveira

Dr. Ivone de Bem Oliveira

Department of Horticultural Sciences

Dr. de Bem Oliveira's research has been focused on the intersection between breeding and genomics, particularly in improving the quality and the time for the release of blueberry varieties. Her research is focused on generating models that associate genetic information with the behavior of the crops in the field. By doing so, her models can predict the best material for propagation, reducing the time for cultivar release; the models developed can also help directing crosses, thus increasing the genetic gain for future release. Currently, Dr. de Bem Oliveira works in the Horticultural Sciences Department at the University of Florida under the supervision of Dr. Patricio R. Muñoz. She is using her training and expertise as a geneticist and plant breeder to develop solutions to optimize the selection process for polyploid species. She primarily works with blueberries, but also has experience in developing models for genome prediction in sugarcane, alfalfa, and soybean. Dr. de Bem Oliveira has made significant contributions to the application of genomic technologies to optimize the breeding process. By using bioinformatics and quantitative genetics theories, she has published the first genomic prediction study applied for blueberry. Dr. de Bem Oliveira obtained her undergraduate degree in Agronomic Engineering from the Federal University of Santa Catarina in 2012. Later, she attended the Federal University of Goias where she completed an MS in Genetic and Plant Breeding (2014). To accomplish her Ph.D. Dr. de Bem Oliveira was awarded a one-year fellowship at the University of Florida (grant n. 88881.131685/2016-01 PDSE/CAPES/MEC), where she developed her expertise on the application of genomic data in breeding processes. Later she earned her Ph.D in Genetic and Plant Breeding from the Federal University of Goias (2018). Find Dr. de Bem Oliveira on LinkedIn. 

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Dr. Hedwin Kitdorlang Dkhar

Dr. Hedwin Kitdorlang Dkhar

Mycobacterium tuberculosis is currently the number one killer amongst the infectious pathogens. Dr. Hedwin Kitdorlang Dkhar (Kit) works as a postdoctoral associate with Dr. Josephine Clark-Curtiss and Dr. Roy Curtiss III in the UF Emerging Pathogens Institute. This group has developed the Recombinant Attenuated Salmonella Vaccines (RASVs) technology for finding cures for many human and animal infectious diseases. Kit leads the Tuberculosis vaccine group, which demands project design, multi-tasking, planning, and training of colleagues. Kit is currently testing an improved RASV vaccine carrying various combinations of Mtb antigens using the mouse model system. His expertise is in microbial infection biology, immunology, molecular biology, cell culture, protein purification, and lipid and cell Biology. Kit works in a BSL2/BSL3 biosafety level facility for immunization and challenge of mice. The major goal of Kit’s project is to answer the big question, can we find a better vaccine to replace or boost BCG? Kit earned his Ph.D.from CSIR-IMTECH-JNU, India in 2014 under the supervision of Dr. Pawan Gupta where he worked with the host-pathogen interaction paradigm during the course of tuberculosis infection.

Dr. Emily Shea Durkin

Dr. Emily Shea Durkin

Department of Biology

Dr. Durkin is interested in the ecology and evolution of parasites and parasitic lifestyles. She works primarily with a facultatively parasitic mite and fly host system. Currently, Dr. Durkin is working with a behavioral disease ecologist to quantify parasitic behavior in the mites, an important component to the evolution of parasitism in some animals. Dr. Durkin earned her Ph.D. in Biology and Ecology at the University of Alberta, Canada.

Photo: Multiple species of wild-caught Drosophila flies with multiple species of mites attached.

Dr. Samantha S. Dykes

Dr. Samantha S. Dykes

Department of Radiation Oncology

Breast cancer cells use cathepsin proteases to break out of the breast duct and travel throughout the body, forming metastasis. Dr. Dykes is investigating whether inhibiting cathepsins using novel agents can slow breast cancer mestastasis. Dr. Dykes earned her PhD from the Department of Microbiology and Immunology at Louisiana State University Health Science Center-Shreveport. 

Dr. Maha A Elbadry

Dr. Maha A Elbadry

Department of Environmental and Global Health

Dr. Elbadry is engaged in arbovirus research in Haiti. She is leading two research activities investigating the transmission of zika virus in Haiti. In addition, Dr. Elbadry is investigating the level of transmission of Keystone virus in Florida, as part of an awarded grant with the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. She was the recipient of The Grinter fellowship in 2011, a travel award from the European Society of Virology in 2018 and recieved the best postdoctoral award in 2018. Dr. earned her Ph.D. at UF in Global Health. 

 

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Dr. Daniel Ence

Dr. Daniel Ence

School of Forest Resources and Conservation

Dr. Ence analyzes genomic sequence data to annotate genes in newly sequenced genomes and to map genes that control economically valuable traits for breeders and growers. He earned his Ph.D. in Human Genetics at the University of Utah. In addition to his research contributions, Dr. Ence serves as a mentor for enthusiastic young scientists.
 

(Above) Mapping Strategy for Disease Gene Loci

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Dr. Lorena Endara

Dr. Lorena Endara

Department of Biology

Dr. Endara uses a combination of molecular and morphological data to answer questions about plant evolution, particularly in groups of Neotropical orchids and gymnosperms. She is currently working on developing bioinformatic pipelines to extract valuable morphological data contained in taxonomic descriptions in order to generate large phenotypic datasets.​ Dr. Endara's contributions to evolutionary biology and botany are helping to facilitate efforts to answer pressing questions regarding the origin and diversification of land plants. Photo: Dr. Endara and colleague Mike Wenzel collecting orchid specimens for microbiome analysis. 

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Dr. Elizabeth M Frick

Dr. Elizabeth M Frick

Department of Horticultural Sciences

Dr. Frick's research focuses on the genetic basis of tomato flavor and the use of molecular genetics and advanced breeding technologies to restore great heirloom flavor into high-performance varieties. Dr. Frick has been awarded the USDA NIFA Pre-doctoral and Post-doctoral Research Fellowships to support her work. She earned her Ph.D. in Plant and Microbial Biosciences at the Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri. 

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Dr. Janak Gaire

Dr. Janak Gaire

Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Dr. Gaire received his PhD from the University of Florida in 2018. During his graduate studies, he worked at the intersection of neuroscience and neural engineering disciplines, particularly focusing on brain-implanted microdevices. He studied the effect of biochemical and mechanical intervention strategies in mitigating foreign body response and improving the functional longevity of brain-implanted microdevices and developed novel tools to facilitate the evaluation of cellular response to brain injury and disease models. Currently, he is working on developing new animal models of regeneration, inspired by the African Spiny Mouse to understand the role of inflammation in mammalian regeneration.

Dr. Anirban Guha

Dr. Anirban Guha

UF/IFAS Citrus Research and Education Center

Dr. Anirban Guha’s main area of research lies in photosynthesis and plant water relations. He has been working on photosynthesis, transpiration, chlorophyll fluorescence and plant hydraulic characteristics in higher plants including trees, horticultural plants as well as different monocots and herbaceous models. Dr. Guha has been conducting research and unravelling the ecophysiological responses of tree species to extreme climate (heat, drought and elevated CO2) using growth chambers and FACE experimental set ups. To answer his research questions, Dr. Guha uses various ecophysiological approaches and imaging techniques including fluorescence, isotopes, gas exchange, sap flow, metabolite profiling, growth traits, and plant anatomy. Currently, he is doing his postdoc at the Citrus Ecophysiology laboratory of Dr. Christopher Vincent at the Citrus Research and Extension Centre, Florida. Dr. Guha’s research is focused on light and shading effects on HLB disease severity in citrus, including effects on photosynthesis, transpiration and carbohydrate allocation. Dr. Guha earned his Ph.D. in the Department of Plant Sciences at the University of Hyderabad, India.Photo: Determining leaf gas exchange rates. 

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Dr. Rene HJ Heim

Dr. Rene HJ Heim

Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering

With a research focus on remote sensing of plant health, Dr. Rene Heim would like to improve the efficiency of agricultural systems to reduce pressure on our natural environments without having to sacrifice productivity. He has a strong interest in openly communicating and integrating discipline-specific knowledge across disciplines. To improve the quality of his work and make it applicable, he is trying to maintain knowledge from disciplines such as plant pathology, functional ecology and computational sciences. Dr. Heim earned a joint PhD at Macquarie University, Australia, and Universitaet Hamburg, Germany. His PhD research was recognized and awarded with distinction. He has been a scholar of the prestigious German scholarship foundation and has a strong international network of collaborators.

Photo: Plant properties, may it be disease symptoms or different types of leaves as seen in the photo above, can be discriminated by looking at their spectral signatures. You can find example signatures on Dr. Heim’s website. Sometimes distinctive properties are not as obvious as those in the image but Dr. Heim and colleagues can still use spectral signatures to detect them. Detecting diseases before obvious symptoms appear is one possible application of this research.

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Dr. Abbi Hernandez

Dr. Abbi Hernandez

Department of Neuroscience

Dr. Hernandez is investigating the effects of metabolism on the neurobiology of cognitive aging in the Burke Lab. Dr. Hernandez earned her PhD in Nueroscience at the University of Florida. 

Dr. Weiming Hu

Dr. Weiming Hu

Department of Entomology and Nematology

Dr. Hu uses next generation sequencing to study gene expression of plant pathogens and the interaction of microbial communities under agriculture management. She earned her Ph.D. in Microbiology at the Chinese Academy of Sciences. Dr. Hu has published four peer-reviewed papers and currently has three manuscripts on the way. 

Dr. Aprinda Indahlastari

Dr. Aprinda Indahlastari

Department of Clinical and Health Psychology

Transcranial electrical stimulation (tES) is a promising non-invasive neuromodulation technique to improve brain functions. While useful, observed tES outcomes have largely varied across individuals, and thus poses a concern in reliability and reproducibility of tES application. Using multimodal neuroimaging and computational models, Dr. Indahlastari’s research goals are to improve tES reliability/reproducibility by: predicting tES current dose in stimulated brain regions, identifying/reducing possible sources of individual variability in tES outcomes, and investigating possible mechanisms of action that contribute to physiological changes caused by tES. Dr. Indahlastari is part of the Woods Neuromodulation Laboratory in the Department of Clinical and Health Psychology. In this lab, her current role involves data analysis in tES participants collected from clinical trials. Specific projects include building a workflow that integrates all tES data analysis (behavior, neuroimaging and computational models) and developing new tools for quality control in tES to ensure reliable tES application across studies.

Dr. Indahlastari earned her PhD in Biomedical Engineering at Arizona State University. She recently received the 2018 NYC Neuromodulation & NANS Young Investigator Award for her work in neuromodulation and was an inaugural recipient of the UF McKnight Brain Institute Trainee Enhancement Opportunities, or MBI-TEOs, awards.

Dr. Riley G. Jones, MD MSc MSc DTM&H

Dr. Riley G. Jones, MD MSc MSc DTM&H

Department of Medicine

Dr. Jones is a clinical Postdoctoral Associate in the Department of Medicine, where he studies global health issues. He holds an MD degree from the University of Louisville, two MSc degrees from King’s College London and Tulane University, and recently completed an internal medicine residency in Cincinnati, OH before coming to UF. He serves half of the year as an attending physician at UF-Gainesville and the other half at clinical sites in Ghana, Haiti, Peru, and Tanzania. Beyond patient care, he studies the use of ultrasound in tropical medicine, the interaction of environment and non-communicable diseases, and health systems quality improvement; his global health research focuses on peace negotiations, rebuilding health systems after civil war, and the role of health in reinforcing or undermining the transition to peace. He has an ongoing study of different peace outcomes in intrastate conflicts and their impact on maternal and child health; he is currently investigating the sovereigntization and political uses of infectious diseases with epidemic potential. He has a personal interest in the role of medical education as a means to rebuild societies after war and teaches remotely in the Horn of Africa in this regard. Along with colleagues in the UK, Dr. Jones was recognized in the House of Commons for redesigning the medical education curriculum which is now used throughout the Horn of Africa.

Dr. Jones recently completed the Gorgas Course in Tropical Medicine in Lima, Peru, where he earned the prestigious designation of DTM&H.

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Dr. Sarah Kim

Dr. Sarah Kim

Center for Pharmacometrics & Systems Pharmacology, Department of Pharmaceutics

Dr. Sarah Kim is a senior postdoctoral associate at the University of Florida’s Center for Pharmacometrics and Systems Pharmacology in Lake Nona (Orlando), working under the supervision by Dr. Stephan Schmidt, Dr. Mirjam Trame and Dr. Larry Lesko. Her current research projects focus on: 1) systems pharmacology modeling to improve drug safety, for which she received the David Goldstein Trainee Award from the American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics (ASCPT) in 2017 and two Presidential Trainee Awards from ASCPT in 2017 and 2018, 2) population pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) modeling and simulations to evaluate the impact of potential bioinequivalence on PD, and 3) physiologically-based absorption pharmacokinetic (PBA-PK) modeling to evaluate the impact of drug formulation and system-specific properties on PK. She also serves as a reviewer for the European Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences, and was selected as one of the most productive reviewers in 2017. Dr. Kim earned her PhD in Biomathematics in the Department of Mathematics at Florida State University, USA.

Dr. Gar Yee Koh

Dr. Gar Yee Koh

IFAS Citrus Research and Education Center

Dr. Gar Yee Koh is a Postdoctoral Associate studying the role of citrus products in the prevention of cardiovascular disease through modulation of gut microbiota.

Learn more about Dr. Koh’s research
Dr. Do Hyong Koh

Dr. Do Hyong Koh

Dr. Koh is conducting research in cognitive science and human computer interaction, with a focus on eye tracking. He earned his Ph.D. in Computer Science at the University of Massachusetts, Boston, USA. 

Dr. Aritra Kundu

Dr. Aritra Kundu

College of Veterinary Medicine

Dr. Aritra Kundu is working on two primary projects at the University of Florida. The first project in the field of peripheral nerve stimulation/neuromodulation for end organ function is providing knowledge that helps to optimize blood glucose regulatory parameters and blood flow by determination of the optimal neurostimulation parameters (current intensity, pulse duration, pulse frequency, train burst duration and waveform) of the nerve sites (vagal sensory, spinal sensory, parasympathetic motor, sympathetic motor) for eventual use in diabetes prevention and therapy. This project will ultimately provide insight into the regulation of β-cell function when the autonomic and sensory nervous system is in healthy or diseased conditions.

Dr. Kundu’s second project aims to enable effective bidirectional control of dexterous hand prosthesis in real-time. The goal is to provide amputees with a prosthetic hand system that moves and provides sensation like a natural hand. The IMplantable Multimodal Peripheral REcording and Stimulation System (IMPRESS) includes electrodes for measuring prosthesis control signals from muscles and motor nerves, and sensory feedback will be delivered through electrodes placed in sensory nerves. The other goal of this project is to validate a computational model with experimental results that would be used to predict recruitment performance of the IMPRESS electrodes.

Dr. Kundu earned his PhD in Biomedical Engineering at Aalborg University. He was awarded best in the posters group at the 2017 University of Florida Postdoctoral Research Symposium.

 

Dr. Suyog S. Kuwar

Dr. Suyog S. Kuwar

Department of Entomology & Nematology

Dr. Kuwar is engineering Bacillus thunringensis (Bt) derived proteins and toxins to increase their efficacy against insect pests.
He earned his PhD in Molecular Biology in the Department of Entomology at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology, Jena, Germany.
Dr. Kuwar is an International Max Planck Research Scholar. He has beed regonized for his scientific communications, including a best poster award, and has given talks at a variety of professional conferences and meetings. He actively contributes to UF and his field as a teacher and through outreach.

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Dr. Kaylie (Ling Ning) Lam

Dr. Kaylie (Ling Ning) Lam

Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry

Diabetes is considered one of the largest emerging threats to health in the 21st century and the sixth main cause of death in the USA. Individuals with diabetes are susceptible to chronic non­healing wounds whereby such wounds precede 84% of all lower extremity amputations and once amputation occurs, patients have a 5 year mortality rate of 50%. In these chronic wounds, opportunistic bacteria colonize the damaged tissue and inhibits the natural healing process. Dr. Lam’s research focus is on understanding the role of iron in an opportunistic bacterium, Enterococcus faecalis. In addition to its prevalence in causing numerous nosocomial infections in hospital patients, it is also a commensal of human oral cavity and gastrointestinal tract. Moreover, E. faecalis is commonly associated with surgical wound infections, even in the absence of diabetes. It is of importance to understand the evolution from a harmless commensal to being one of the most dangerous pathogens with regards to antibiotic resistance in the recent years. Bacteria require essential transition metals for a multitude of processes, and efficient acquisition of iron is important for infection. Dr. Lam’s working hypotheses are that bacterial metal uptake systems play a major role in wound infection and that patients with uncontrolled diabetes are unable to maintain metal homeostasis at the wound site, and this negatively affects the wound healing process. Dr. Lam earned her PhD in Biological Sciences at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. One of Dr. Lam’s notable research accomplishments was the establishment of an in vivo model for Enterococcus faecalis colonization of the gastrointestinal tract.

Dr. Bárbara S. F. Müller

Dr. Bárbara S. F. Müller

Department of Horticultural Sciences

Dr. Bárbara S. F. Müller combines genomics and transcriptomics with population and quantitative genetics to elucidate the genetic basis of complex traits in plants, including maize, peanut, common bean and eucalypts. Dr. Müller obtained her bachelor’s degree in Biology from the Federal University of Goiás (UFG, Brazil) and her master’s degree in Genetics and Breeding from the Federal University of Viçosa (UFV, Brazil). Dr. Müller earned her Ph.D. in Molecular Biology from the University of Brasília (UnB, Brazil) and was a Postdoctoral Research Associate in the Institute of Plant Breeding, Genetics & Genomics (IPBGG) at University of Georgia (UGA, USA). Currently, Dr. Müller is a Postdoctoral Associate at the Plant Cell & Molecular Biology Laboratory (A. Mark Settles’ lab) from the Horticultural Sciences Department at University of Florida (UF, USA). She has experience applying genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to detect and characterize the genetics behind important traits and, from a more breeding applied perspective, she applies genomic selection (GS) to accelerate breeding cycles and increase selection efficiency in plants. Müller is particularly motivated by how these approaches provide the possibility to translate scientific knowledge to practical breeding challenges, directly impacting society in a positive way for food, feedstock, paper/pulp and wood production.

Figure: Genomic selection (GS) in forest trees (Grattapaglia et al. 2018).

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Dr. Andrew Nguyen

Dr. Andrew Nguyen

Department of Entomology and Nematology

Insects consistently attack and damage our food sources (crops). Often times, they prefer our crops over ones they have evolved to eat, also known as host switching. Dr. Nguyen aims to understand the physiological and evolutionary mechanisms that allow insects to host switch. Dr. Nguyen earned his PhD in Evolutionary Biology from the University of Vermont. He is interested in the forces that shape all levels of biological diversity from ecosystems to genes.

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Dr. Nguyen Tri Nguyen

Dr. Nguyen Tri Nguyen

Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Dr. Nguyen conducts research to determine and implement advanced stabilization techniques and time marching schemes for the deliverable PSAAP-II code CMT-Nek (NNSA’s Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program II ), as well as integrate the finding of CS and exascale behavioral emulation into this code. He earned his PhD from the Department of Civil, Environmental and Mechanical Engineering at the University of Trento, Italy. Right Photo: The falling droplet with a HLLEM Riemann solver.

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Dr. Mohammad-Zaman Nouri

Dr. Mohammad-Zaman Nouri

Department of Physiological Sciences and Center for Environmental and Human Toxicology

Dr. Nouri is analyzing steroid hormones and performing lipidomics for various biological samples using ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. These analyses are part of the toxicology research studies in the Center for Environmental and Human Toxicology. Dr. Nouri is developing high-throughput and robust techniques for quantification of hormones and lipids, especially in low-volume or small size samples. He had been awarded a Japanese government scholarship and received his PhD in Biotechnology from University of Tsukuba, Japan in 2011. Dr. Nouri has published about 30 peer-reviewed papers or book chapters and is skillful in reviewing manuscripts for journals in plant biology and proteomics.

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Dr. Shreela Palit

Dr. Shreela Palit

Dr. Palit’s research has focused on exploring mechanisms influencing pain processing (e.g., genetics, emotion, ethnic differences), primarily through the use of psychophysiological assessment and quantitative sensory testing methods. Her current research interests include further investigation of biopsychosocial determinants of pain across the lifespan, as well as development of novel psychological interventions and enhancement of existing treatment approaches for chronic pain management. Dr. Palit was awarded a National Science Foundation (NSF) Graduate Research Fellowship in 2013 in recognition of her future contributions to science and education. This award supported her doctoral dissertation work in Clinical Psychology at the University of Tulsa, Oklahoma. 

 

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Dr. Suresh Pannerselvam

Dr. Suresh Pannerselvam

Department of Entomology and Nematology

Dr. Pannerselvam is working on the construction of a pesticidal protein database and the development of an improved classification algorithm. Dr. Pannerselvam earned his Ph.D. in Molecular Science and Technology from Ajou University, South Korea, with a Brain Korea (BK21) Scholarship funded by the Korean government. He has also been awarded a Senior Research Fellowship by the Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, India. Image, below: Development of a Pesticidal Protein Resource Center.

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Dr. Mayur Parmar

Dr. Mayur Parmar

Department of Neurology

Dr. Parmar's professional research interests include multidisciplinary areas of biological sciences, including Pharmacology, Toxicology, and molecular/cellular biology, which are complimented by his extensive research experience in Neuroscience. Dr. Parmar has been involved in CNS research focused on understanding the pathological mechanisms (molecular, genetic, and cellular basis) underlying the development of neurodegenerative diseases (Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s) and potential therapeutic intervention to halt the disease progression. Currently, as a Postdoctoral Research Associate at the Center for Translational Research in Neurodegenerative diseases (CTRND), Dr. Parmar is focused on understanding the role of Rab GTPase proteins in neurodegenerative α-synucleinopathies (Parkinson's, Dementia with Lewy Body & Multiple system atrophy) and tauopathies [Alzheimer's, Corticobasal Degeneration (CBD) & Progressive Supranuclear Palsy(PSP)] disorder. Further, Dr. Parmar has been involved in research focused on evaluating genetic risk factors associated with PSP and CBD using AAV-mediated technology. He earned his Ph.D. in Pharmacology and Toxicology at Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA. Rab GTPase regulatory cycle.

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Dr. Lucia Pastor Palomo

Dr. Lucia Pastor Palomo

Department of Pathology, Immunology and Laboratory Medicine

Dr. Pastor Palomo’s research focuses on genetics and pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, in particular type 1 diabetes (T1D). Her research is improving our understanding of the role of variation in the expression of genes associated with T1D or the structure of their protein products impacts T1D pathology.

Dr. Pastor Palomo completed her PhD in Medicine at the University of Barcelona in the area of early diagnosis and monitoring of HIV infection in Sub-Saharan Africa with support from a fellowship from the Spanish Ministry of Health. Throughout her doctoral degree, she developed a project that was co-funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the Spanish Ministry of Science. This project was a multi-site collaboration involving 7 international research institutes where Dr. Pastor Palomo played the active role of study coordinator. While based in a research center in Mozambique, she trained, managed and led a multidisciplinary-team, as well as supervised patient recruitment, data collection and sample processing. Later on, Dr. Pastor Palomo accomplished the quantification and data analysis of several soluble and cell-associated biomarkers in the study samples at the laboratory facilities in Barcelona. The findings from her thesis provided a detailed characterization of immune biomarkers over the different stages of HIV infection. This work shed light into the early pathogenic events following HIV acquisition and allowed for identification a valuable plasma biomarker, the IP-10 cytokine that can be used to accurately screen individuals for early HIV infection and treatment failure in scarce-resource settings. Consequently, Dr. Pastor Palomo and colleagues have published 7 peer-reviewed articles in high impact-factor journals and different industrial companies and research teams have shown their interest in further validating the findings to develop a commercial diagnostic test based on the biomarker.

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Dr. Sudhir Kumar Rai

Dr. Sudhir Kumar Rai

Division of Endrocrinology, Diabetes & Metabolism, Department of Medicine

Dr.Rai is a Basic Science Postdoctoral Research Associate in the Department of Medicine. His research interests are largely directed towards understanding how polyamine (Polycationic small molecules) systems (Genetic, Molecular Biology and Biochemistry) interact during human disease. Polycationic small molecules widely distributed throughout the cell that control every aspect of cell. Dr.Rai is interested in learning how the polyamine components rewired cancer epigenome and more specifically how retrograde components influence development and progression of cancer. Dr.Rai’s research will open new therapeutic avenues that may lead to the formulation of novel treatments for cancers. Dr.Rai earned his Ph.D in Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, Tezpur University (Central), Assam, India, where he discovered and deposited 16S-rRNA sequence data in GENBANK NCBI database for novel microbes isolated from North-Eastern states of  India  producing therapeutic grade enzymes(Fibrinolytic and direct-acting thrombolytic) for treatment of myocardial infarction and cardiovascular disease. During his Ph.D research, he was nominated for the Young Scientist award in the New Biology section of the 98th Indian Science Congress Association-2010, SRM Chennai. Dr.Rai received the Senior Research Fellow award from the Council of Scientific and Industrial research (CSIR-SRF) in 2008. At present, Dr.Rai is serving on the editorial board for the Advances in Enzyme Research (AER) journal, and reviewers for Elsevier journals. 

Dr. Keesha Roach

Dr. Keesha Roach

Community Dentistry and Behavioral Science, College of Dentistry

Dr. Roach is a Nurse Scientist and a postdoctoral fellow in Community Dentistry and Behavioral Science at the University of Florida in the College of Dentistry. Dr. Roach obtained a BS in psychology from the University of Maryland College Park, ABSN from Loyola University Chicago, MS from DePaul University and her doctorate from the University of Illinois at Chicago. Dr. Roach is a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Future of Nursing Scholar alum. She received a postdoctoral fellowship with a focus on pain and aging thru the Integrative and Multidisciplinary Pain and Aging Research Training (IMPART), (T32-AG049673, Fillingham PI) and a partnership with the UF Pain Research Intervention Center of Excellence (PRICE) under the mentorship of Drs. Fillingim, Wilkie, and Cruz-Almeida. As part of the T32, her research explores measurement of pain phenotypes, pain related genetics, epigenetics, and mechanism-based pain management, primarily in persons who have sickle cell disease.

Dr. Justin Schon

Dr. Justin Schon

Department of Anthropology

Dr. Justin Schon’s work examines how ordinary people respond to violence and environmental change. Dr. Schon earned his PhD in the department of Political Science at Indianan University, Bloomington.

Photo: The "Champs Elysees" street in Jordan's Zaatari camp for Syrian refugees

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Dr. Kacoli Sen

Dr. Kacoli Sen

Department of Chemical Engineering

Dr. Sen is elucidating the altered cellular dynamics elicited by hyperthermia.​ Understanding the cross talk between cancer cells exposed to hyperthermia and immune cells will aid in the development of improved cancer immunostimulatory therapeutic strategies and regimens. Dr. Sen earned her PhD in Cancer Nanotherapeutics from the School of Medical Science and Technology at the Indian Institute of Technology in Kharagpur​, India. She has been awarded the Junior Research Fellowship (2009) and Senior Research Fellowship (2012) by the University Grants Commission. Dr. Sen's journal article entitled “Second generation liposomal cancer therapeutics: transition from laboratory” has been acknowledged as one of the top 25 most downloaded articles published in the International Journal of Pharmaceutics from January-June, 2013.

Dr. Christine Elizabeth Stephens

Dr. Christine Elizabeth Stephens

Dr. Stephens investigates intestinal absorption and secretion with the goal of understanding how oxalate can be secreted by the intestine to reduce kidney stone risk. She achieves this through measuring the transport of ions and molecules across intestinal tissue in response to various stimuli, using tissue models missing various transport proteins. Dr. Stephens earned her PhD in the College of Life and Environmental Sciences, researching the physiology of calcium carbonate (chalk) production in marine fish intestines and the environmental impact of this important component in the carbon cycle.

 

Dr. Banikalyan Swain

Dr. Banikalyan Swain

Infectious Diseases & Immunology, College of Veterinary Medicine

Dr. Swain's research involves the design, construction and evaluation of vaccines to elicit protective host immune responses in agriculturally important aquatic animals. He is interested in the study of molecular mechanisms of bacterial, parasite and viral pathogenesis, and host immune responses in aquatic animals in order to develop needle free vaccines. Dr. Swain's primary work is focused on genetic modification of bacterial pathogens, such as E. piscicida and E. ictaluri, as live vaccines to prevent systemic granulomatous disease and enteric septicemia of both freshwater and marine fish. As part of his postdoctoral research in Prof. Roy Curtiss’s lab, Dr. Swain has successfully designed and constructed a recombinant attenuated Edwardsiella vaccine (RAEV) vector system with regulated delayed attenuation and regulated delayed lysis system. RAEV constructs with the regulated delayed lysis in vivo attribute induce maximal mucosal, systemic and cellular immune responses against pathogens whose protective antigens are delivered by the vaccine construct. Dr. Swain is currently constructing RAEV strains for synthesis and delivery of Ichthyophthirius multifiliis (Ich) and Aeromonas hydrophila protective antigens to prevent white spot diseases and aeromoniasis in aquaculture.

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Dr. Yuanchun Wang

Dr. Yuanchun Wang

Plant Pathology

Dr. Wang's research focuses on Transgene-free gene editing of Citrus sinensis via CRISPR/Cas9 technology. She earned her Ph.D. in the Department of Microbiology at the China Agricultural University. Dr. Wang has identified and published on two new species of Ensifer, nitrogen-fixing bacteria.

Dr. Rui Yang

Dr. Rui Yang

IFAS North Florida Research and Education Center

Among agronomic crops, perhaps no other has sparked as much passion as industrial hemp (Cannabis Sativa L.). Hemp has been an important crop throughout human history for food, fiber, and medicine. With the legalization of industrial hemp in the United States arriving late in 2018 at the federal level, it appears to be gearing up for a new day in the sun. Many of the previous studies have focused on grain and/or fiber production from industrial hemp. Little information is available in published literature regarding production of cannabidiol (CBD), which is one of the over 100 chemicals produced by hemp and has great medicinal value. For example, in the United States, clinical trials are investigating CBD for treatment of 26 medical conditions. Furthermore, CBD has been granted orphan drug status for eleven conditions. Dr. Yang’s current study focuses on evaluating and developing agronomic practices (e.g., variety trial, fertilization, planting and harvesting management, and pest control) for optimal industrial hemp production in Florida.

During his academic training in Agronomy and Soil Science at Auburn University, Dr. Yang was been connected with multiple projects over a wide span of topics and collaborations from different researchers at many institutions, which has enabled him to be an effective researcher. He is the leading author of multiple peer-reviewed articles published in or submitted to high ranked journals (e.g., Frontiers in Plant Sciences and Journal of Agronomy and Crop Science). Dr. Yang has also drafted a few extension articles for publication based on his previous research projects. He has extensively presented his work at both professional conferences and agricultural extension activities as well.

Photo: Vigorously growing seedlings of industrial hemp in the greenhouse.

Dr. Yunchao Yang

Dr. Yunchao Yang

Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Dr. Yang is currently a PostDoctoral Research Associate in the Center of Compressible Multiphase Flow at the University of Florida. He received his Ph.D. degree in Thermal Engineering from the University of Miami (2018). He obtained his Master and Bachelor's degree in Thermal Engineering from Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, China. His research interests lie in the area of Computational Fluid Dynamics, flow control, aircraft design, and multiphase flow. ranging from theory, to design, and to implementation. He has collaborated actively with researchers in several other disciplines of computer science, particularly high-performance computing and machine learning. His honors include the China National Scholarship for the graduate/undergraduate student – the highest honor bestowed by the Chinese government on outstanding graduate/undergraduate students. He has authored or co-authored more than thirty peer-reviewed papers in top journals and proceedings. He has given technical talks in major conferences AIAA/ASME/SAE, and he has presented research in NASA Ames.

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Dr. Brittney Yegla

Dr. Brittney Yegla

Department of Neuroscience

Dr. Yegla is a postdoctoral research associate under the mentorship of Dr. Thomas Foster. Her research is focused on investigating cognitive function in an animal model of aging to determine factors related to resilience and, alternatively, neurodegeneration with rising age. She utilizes a multi-system approach to examine the dynamic shifts in cellular, molecular, and circuit-level components that impact cognition, specifically those dependent upon the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus which exhibit greatest age-related functional decline. Dr. Yegla’s work currently focuses on two main lines of research, one of which examines exercise-induced exosome release as a mediator of exercise’s cognitive benefits, utilizing next-generation sequencing to examine exosomal miRNA content. The second line of research evaluates the heightened inflammatory milieu in the aging brain. By manipulating its response through microglial depletion and endotoxins, Dr. Yegla gains insight into the impact of neuroinflammation in aging on attentional function, as well as spatial and fear memory.

Dr. Yegla earned her Ph.D. in Psychology and Neuroscience at Temple University. Dr. Yegla acquired a P30 grant from the Pepper Center, as well as additional contributions from the Age-Related Memory Loss program at the McKnight Brain Institute, to fund her project examining exosomal mediation of exercise-induced benefits in aging.

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Dr. Evelyn Zuniga

Dr. Evelyn Zuniga

College of Agricultural and Life Sciences 

Dr. Zuniga is an experienced scientist involved in the research fields of molecular biology, plant transformation and genome editing (CRISPR). She has been involved in multiple projects related to the genetic modification of different crops. Dr. Zuniga is a proactive, dedicated and a well-organized person who always pays attention to detail. Throughout her career she has developed excellent problem solving, organizational and communication skills required in a wide variety of work situations.  Dr. Zuniga has had the opportunity to work with excellent research teams which led her to appreciate the importance of knowledge sharing with fellow colleagues and the scientific community. Dr. Zuniga is always excited to learn new things and she enjoys working in collaborative environments where the potential of several disciplines is exploited towards the achievement of large scale goals.

Dr. Zuniga earned her Ph.D. in the School of Biology and Environmental Sciences at the University College of Dublin. She was awarded best undergraduate research work in the field of Genetics and Biotechnology from the Colombian Association of Biological Sciences.

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